Self-Guided Tour

    Section I

  • Sculpture: Trunnion II
    Artist: Dale Graham
    Media: Aluminum
    Location: Section I

    Aluminum

    Kentucky-based sculptor Dale Graham uses his background in mathematics and engineering to create sculptures that make us aware of the principles governing the creation of structures and bridges. This aluminum sculpture features a trunnion, a cylindrical pin like that on a cannon that forms the axis on which it pivots, a device also used in bridge design. Graham chose to use lightweight aluminum instead of heavy steel so that his sculpture could be more easily transported from place to place.  He burnished the surface of the sculpture so that it reflects light in irregular patterns adding to the “lightness” of the piece.

    This sculpture has been donated to the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park by the artist and is now part of the Park’s permanent collection.

  • Sculpture: La Souterraine
    Artist: Robert Smart
    Media: Steel / Cast Iron
    Location: Section I

    Steel and Cast Iron

    La Souterraine is the name of a small village in France that held an arts festival in which the artist participated. Smart asked some citizens to volunteer to have life casts made of their faces. He tape recorded interviews and took photographs. The sixteen cast iron faces, set atop steel posts grouped in twos and threes, vary by sex, age, and expression. To the artist these “faces are merely an indelible memory of a shared event.”

  • Sculpture: Gargoyle
    Artist: John Parker
    Media: Welded Steel
    Location: Section I

    Welded Steel

    Pennsylvania sculptor Parker created “Gargoyle” to be “the gatekeeper of the park.” The sculpture reflects his interest in insects, dinosaurs and exotic flowers. By combining “nature with steel,” he gives a “heavy industrial material a loving animated presence.” The sculpture is made of weathered steel plate, cut, bent and bolted together.

  • Sculpture: Revival
    Artist: Joseph Eisenhauer
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section I

    Painted Steel

    This large-scale abstract sculpture consists of steel that has been cut, welded, bolted, and painted. Eisenhauer wants to communicate with the viewer “through line, shape, and form.” He arranged the steel pieces together to create straight, curved, and jagged lines. When combined, these lines form asymmetrically balanced geometric and architectural shapes that seem to reach out into space.

    As of 2018, this sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Spread My Wings
    Artist: Barbara Goldsmith
    Media: Concrete
    Location: Section I

    Concrete

    Chicago area sculptor Goldsmith first created this striding figure in clay and then cast it into concrete. Beginning with figurative images, she works to simplify the human form to get to its essence. The gesture combines the heavy earthbound bottom of the figure with the light wing-like upper form.

    This sculpture, donated by the artist, is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Baile de Alacrán
    Artist: Ted Sitting Crow Garner
    Media: Galvanized Steel
    Location: Section I

    Galvanized Steel

    “Baile de Alacrán,” which means “Dance of the Scorpion” in Spanish, is made by a Native American artist living in the Chicago area. He says his sculpture is “cursive, transparent and abstract.” It was made by bending pipes to which expanded open work metal sheets were welded.  Garner is known for creating sculptural benches.  This sculpture, while not a comfortable place to sit, has a bench-like quality.

  • Sculpture: Fly Away Home
    Artist: Andrew Arvanetes
    Media: Stainless Steel
    Location: Section I

    Stainless Steel

    Andrew Arvanetes’ sculptures entice the imagination. Fly Away Home is one of the large-scale characters he creates.  His works consist of compositions of shiny geometric shapes which seem to come alive in a realm where they dance, talk and interact with the viewer in a very spirited fashion.

    Winner of 2017 Louis Weinberg Sculpture Competition

  • Sculpture: Inside Plant
    Artist: Andy Zimmermann
    Media: Welded Steel
    Location: Section I

    Welded Steel

    Massachusetts artist, Zimmermann, created this plant-like sculpture of steel cut and welded into organic 3-Dimensional forms. The sculpture is meant to connect to the trees, rocks and plants in the natural environment. It invites the viewer to come “inside” and view space from within the sculpture.

  • Sculpture: Katia
    Artist: Curt Brill
    Media: Bronze
    Location: Section I

    Bronze

    This Arizona sculptor created “Katia” originally in clay and then had it cast into bronze. The artist tells us that he is interested in three particular elements in this sculpture. They are movement, humor and serenity. The artist, in addition to making  sculpture, has worked with physically and mentally challenged people. He searches in his work for the “hidden human spirit.”

  • Sculpture: Donor Tree
    Artist: Joseph Folise
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section I

    Painted Steel

    “Donor Tree” was designed by Chicago area artist, Folise, to serve dual purposes: one, as a unique sculpture and, additionally, as a legacy fundraiser for the Sculpture Park. It allows patrons to add their names or those of loved ones, businesses or organizations to a piece of enduring sculpture at a prime location in the park for all visitors to see.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Benevolence
    Artist: Richard Taylor
    Media: Painted Aluminum
    Location: Section I

    Painted Aluminum

    Milwaukee sculptor, Taylor, a former winner of the Lewis C. Weinberg Competition, has made a sculpture with the theme of “choices”.   He uses a chess piece as his reference to discuss the choices we all need to make in games and in life.

    His sculpture is made of aluminum that has been finished with polyurethane paints to achieve the bright, permanent colors
    he wanted for this sculpture.

  • Sculpture: Pater Familias
    Artist: Lincoln Schatz
    Media: Welded Steel
    Location: Section I

    Welded Steel

    Composed of steel bar and wires, this sculpture by a Chicago artist tells the story of the turbulent relationship of the artist and his father. The two different sized chairs tipping over and the tornado-like cone help to tell this story in 3-Dimensional form.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Shapeshifter
    Artist: Michael Grucza
    Media: Stainless Steel
    Location: Section I

    Stainless Steel

    This Chicago artist likes to use industrial materials in unusual ways.  He works with simple shapes and he contrasts elements such as transparent and opaque forms within one piece.  He is inspired by children’s drawings and he often makes a small model and works with industrial craftsman to form the larger piece.

    Polished perforated stainless steel, powder-coated aluminum tubing and painted steel plate.

  • Sculpture: Second Breath
    Artist: Maurice Blik
    Media: Resin
    Location: Section I

    Resin

    Blik, a holocaust survivor as a child, lived and studied in London where he is now a fellow of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. This expressive figure is one of a series that talks about redemption, about getting a second chance in life. The figure was first created in clay and then cast into polyester resin. It speaks of the human spirit finding freedom.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: A Matter of Time
    Artist: Bill Cooper
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section I

    Steel

    The artist is the owner of a forge,  where metal is heated and formed by hammering and pressure. This sculpture is solid steel and its shape and surface textures are made by forging. The piece refers to time and asks viewers to think about time, measured in terms of millennia. The sculpture is designed so that it acts as a solar observatory. By facing each element of the sculpture and looking at the horizon you can find the location of the sunrise and sunset for each season of the year.

  • Sculpture: Hero
    Artist: Charles Fuller Cowles
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section I

    Painted Steel

    Minnesota sculptor Cowles created an animated figure that pays tribute to the farmer and farm life. He uses tools and parts of farm equipment and farm machinery colors to create this effect. The piece is made of sheets and rods of steel welded and bolted together and then painted using the colors of a John Deere tractor.

  • Sculpture: Reverie
    Artist: Sheila Oettinger
    Media: Stoneware
    Location: Section I

    Stoneware

    This figure, made of stoneware clay, was made by a Chicago area sculptor. The elegant woman as depicted is thinking about and relating to the Sculpture Park, the landscape she sits in. “Reverie” was sculpted in one large solid form, hollowed, cut apart, fired and then reassembled. The artist is interested in the infinite possibilities of the human figure as pure form and in psychological and emotional terms.

    This sculpture was donated by the artist and is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Lazarus and the Rich Man
    Artist: Aaron Benson
    Media: Stoneware
    Location: Section I

    Stoneware

    This ceramic sculpture  (high fired clay), accented with metallic oxides and other ceramic colorants, has an interesting and detailed surface.  Looking carefully one can find faces, hands, bones and other forms within the piece.   The sculpture as originally installed had a second section which has now been removed.  Although the title invites viewers to recall the biblical parable, making the connection may prove challenging without the other form.  It can be interesting, however, to think about the elements in this piece and try to  determine their significance.  Indeed, it is interesting to think about the significance of the large form itself, what it looks like to the viewer and what the artist intended it to be.

    This sculpture was donated by the artist and is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Aspire
    Artist: Terrence Karpowicz
    Media: Stone, Steel, and Bronze
    Location: Section I

    Stone, Steel, and Bronze

    This Chicago artist, who co-founded the Pier Walk Sculpture Shows, works in metal, wood and stone. This sculpture is an abstract “formal” piece that, through its materials and construction, talks about man’s desire to “aspire”, to move upward toward heaven. It shows that the path is not even or straight, but, with simple elegance, meanders skyward.

  • Sculpture: Shadow
    Artist: Lucy Slivinski
    Media: Steel Chains
    Location: Section I

    Steel Chains

    Slivinski uses a variety of industrial materials and found objects, such as chains, to weave or construct vessel, basket or nest forms. She is drawn to these materials for their history and function as well as their aesthetic appeal. Slivinski emphasizes the innate qualities of the materials as she manipulates them using many traditional crafting techniques also rich in history. Some of these techniques include welding, crocheting, weaving, bailing and coiling. The result is richly textured and patinated, and heavily layered. Yet, there remains a wonderfully ethereal quality generated by the light and air filtering through the chains. “Given my varied approach to different processes and materials, there is a continued interplay between industrial and organic, between hard and soft and between solid and ethereal forms,” says Slivinski.

  • Sculpture: Bridge To The Next Millennium
    Artist: Jack Holme
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section I

    Steel

    Holme created the idea for this sculpture by playing on a miniature scale with found objects; next came a maquette, a small steel version of the sculpture. Last, the piece was fabricated in its full size, 10 times larger than the model. The piece symbolically represents our passage to the future. The openings represent the pitfalls for those unprepared to meet  new challenges.  The sculpture was created to celebrate the beginning of the 21st century.

    The artist donated his sculpture and it is now part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Fairy Circle
    Artist: Mark Chatterley
    Media: High Fired Clay and Crater Glaze
    Location: Section I

    High Fired Clay and Crater Glaze

    The seven figures that make up Fairy Circle are made of fired clay. At first all the ladies seem to be alike but each has subtle differences. The sculptor often creates groups of figures and is interested in how the figures relate to each other. Michigan sculptor Chatterley is noted for the unusual CRATER glaze he uses on his sculptures. The blue-green glaze with its rough surface has become his trademark. A crater glaze bubbles and boils while it is in the kiln. The surface of the sculpture reflects that process. The artist  built a special kiln large enough to accommodate each full-size figure.

    This sculpture, donated by the artist, is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Weeee
    Artist: Patrick McDonald
    Media: Steel and Concrete
    Location: Section I

    Steel and Concrete

    Oak Park artist Patrick McDonald cast concrete into a towering, tapered monumental form, pierced by circular openings that diminish in size as the eye moves upward. The concrete mass is also offset by a series of protruding steel rods that frame the shape and create interesting patterns in bright sunlight. The artist varies the surface texture from one area to another. McDonald made the work by using full-scale drawings and a model, from which he built the forms and cast the concrete. “Weeee” is set into a concrete base and weighs approximately 20,000 pounds. The Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park commissioned McDonald to construct this sculpture on-site—a process that took several weeks in October 2002.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Lingo
    Artist: Chris Duncan
    Media: Steel and Concrete
    Location: Section I

    Steel and Concrete

    Duncan used additive and subtractive sculptural processes to make this abstract sculpture. The artist made the work by welding together a steel armature and burying it in the ground. He then poured concrete over it, later removing some of the concrete to reveal the steel underneath. These multiple steps enabled Duncan to create Lingo’s various textural surfaces and its asymmetrically balanced form.

  • Sculpture: CLIO
    Artist: Sharon Loper
    Media: Bronze
    Location: Section I

    Bronze

    Most of Sharon Loper’s sculptures are of human and animal forms. Her female figures are often elongated and posed in very statuesque and serene ways. They seem mysterious. Note the eyes of this sculpture; they impart an almost other-worldly look.  Loper works initially in clay in a very contemporary direct style. You can see the way she added clay to the sculpture and can find her tool marks as well. The finished clay model was taken to a foundry and cast into bronze using the lost wax method of casting.

    Artist’s Website

    Artist Interview

  • Sculpture: Like Clockwork
    Artist: Samuel Spiczka
    Media: Corten Steel and Wood
    Location: Section I

    Corten Steel and Wood

    This Minnesota artist has created a sculpture primarily of steel, but with elements of wood and rubber as well. His piece, hanging like a pendulum, speaks about “the human condition” and about the mechanization of our modern society. The artist’s concerns are very philosophical and he wishes to challenge us to view his complex work and find in it new ideas and meanings.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Section II

  • Sculpture: Gapingstock
    Artist: Jim Agard
    Media: Corten Steel
    Location: Section II

    Corten Steel

    Mr. Agard is a professor of Art at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. Gapingstock is an abstract sculpture wherein the artist has created two unique interlocking shapes that occupy space in a beautiful and intriguing manner. He is interested in “how forms fit together and in creating formal compositions that are uniquely his own.” He does not want the shapes he creates to refer to any recognizable forms or objects.

  • Sculpture: Circinus
    Artist: Drew Goerlitz
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section II

    Steel

    New York-based Goerlitz creates a different relationship between two recognizable objects first by enlarging the scale of the compass and anvil and then juxtaposing these two objects, he reverses the original relationship between a slender compass and a massive anvil. Goerlitz sees his sculpture as a “visual commentary on the conflict of gender in society”.  As such, the compass, usually thought of as a delicate instrument, towers over the masculine anvil.

  • Sculpture: Points of Influence
    Artist: Darrin Hallowell
    Media: Concrete
    Location: Section II

    “Glasstone” A proprietary high strength concrete containing recycled glass

    This installation consists of multiple pieces with each one being the hollowed out image of the human form.  The various pieces have been placed to allow visitors to walk among them.
    The artist states that it “focuses on fundamental aspects of human relationships and communication…”  It is based “on the figure as a vessel, empty or filled…”

  • Sculpture: Strike II
    Artist: Larry Paul King
    Media: Steel, Steel Mesh, Tar and Paint
    Location: Section II

    Steel, Steel Mesh, Tar and Paint

    The Chicago-born artist created a skeleton or substructure of steel bars, which he then covered with steel mesh and tar. Originally, in a sculpture called “Strike” (exhibited at the park from 1997-2000), he covered the armature with grass reeds. In this version, the reeds have been removed and paint with graphite has been applied in certain areas. King conceived the work as relating to the verb “to strike,” meaning “to strike something with a point, as in lightning.”

  • Sculpture: Lost Route
    Artist: Mike Baur
    Media: Steel and Cast Concrete
    Location: Section II

    Steel and Cast Concrete

    Chicago area sculptor Baur prefers not to discuss his work — he wants it to speak for itself. Viewers usually see ship-like-forms, hulls, rudder, oars, etc. Art critics have spoken glowingly about the artist’s ability to take “brute materials and transform them into refined poetic forms.”

    artist website: http://www.mikebaursculpture.com/

  • Sculpture: The Eagle Flies On Friday
    Artist: Richard Heinrich
    Media: Stainless Steel
    Location: Section II

    Stainless Steel

    New York sculptor Heinrich says this sculpture’s title derives from a blues song lyric. He listens to music as he works. His intention was to use gravity defying elements to enable the sculpture to reach upward with a minimum of material and weight. The piece suggests perhaps a nest or flowers-like forms.

  • Sculpture: Apple Rocket
    Artist: Rob Lorenson
    Media: Stainless Steel and Bronze
    Location: Section II

    Stainless Steel and Bronze

    Massachusetts artist Lorenson combines steel and bronze into a formal composition that is concerned with surfaces and patinas. The artist says he did not set out to make an “apple rocket.” The title came afterwards because viewers saw these images in the sculpture.

  • Sculpture: For Those
    Artist: Mark Warwick
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section II

    Steel

    British artist Warwick now lives in Pennsylvania. The piece is made of steel, finished in three different ways. The forms, both straight-sided and curved, were inspired by American architecture, its simplicity in contrast to the decorativeness of European buildings. His desire is “to create an architecture in which no one lives.”

  • Sculpture: Isolation #5
    Artist: Sharon Loper
    Media: Cast Bronze
    Location: Section II

    Cast Bronze

    This California artist’s concerns are about the human figure and its ability to communicate without words. The figure was first made in clay in a technique combining classical methodology with contemporary feel and execution. The figure was cast into bronze by the lost wax method. The siting of the piece in the Park contributes to the sense of “isolation.”

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Flight
    Artist: Luigi Testa
    Media: Steel and Stone
    Location: Section II

    Steel and Stone

    This sculpture of raw steel with sharp edged forms cut and welded by the artist form a stark contrast to the natural stone they enfold. The initially simple almost geometic shapes that make up the sculpture, on closer examination, reveal themselves to be quite unique and conplex. The resulting abstracted bird-like or insect-like form gives the viewer a sense of movement or flight on the higher level, while the lower half of the sculpture seems firmly on the ground.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Wing
    Artist: Andrei Rabodzeenko
    Media: Structural Steel and Stainless Steel
    Location: Section II

    Structural Steel and Stainless Steel

    The sculptor was born and educated in the former Soviet Union. His welded structural and stainless steel sculpture was inspired by and derives its shape from that of a bird’s wing. The sculpture offers several contradictions: One, there is only one wing, where we usually think of wings in pairs. Two, this wing is on the ground. We usually think of wings in the air, in flight. Third, this sculpture has  distinct front and back views.

  • Sculpture: Porte Des Morts
    Artist: Tamsie Ringler
    Media: Steel and Stones
    Location: Section II

    Steel and Stones

    Ms. Ringler’s work  involves creating diverse sculptural installations.  This sculpture was inspired by memories of the artist’s grandmother’s house in Door County, Wisconsin, in an area called “Porte des Mort,” therefore the title of the piece. She wants viewers to ‘re-experience’ the idea of house as an image.  She would like us to consider that it is open not solid and yet has the architectural form of a specific place.  The stones in the interior were collected from the area of the Porte Des Mort.

    This sculpture was donated  by the artist and is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Table Sculpture: Can't Recall a Time
    Artist: John Hock
    Media: Welded Steel
    Location: Section II

    Welded Steel

    The artist says that his sculpture is a metaphysical statement. He calls sculptures at their best akin to poetry and music. This piece was inspired by the sculpture of Constantine Brancusi, whose sculptures integrated object and base. One view of this piece can remind one of Brancusi’s “Bird in Space”. The sculpture, the largest in the Sculpture Park, took several months of heavy work to complete. The base alone weight 15,000 pounds.

    Artist’s Website

    Video Interview w/ John Hock

  • Sculpture: Vertical Barge
    Artist: John Ruppert
    Media: Cast Steel
    Location: Section II

    Cast Steel

    A sculptor and professor in Maryland, Mr. Ruppert created this sculpture by pouring molten steel into an open mold containing a real steel chain. He was inspired by working in an iron foundry on the Mississippi River. The textures were the result of the bubbling created when the hot molten steel hit the cold chain.

  • Sculpture: Expanding Universe
    Artist: Eric Lindsey
    Media: Fiberglass, Granite, Galvanized Steel
    Location: Section II

    Fiberglass, Granite, Galvanized Steel

    This sculpture is designed to give a pleasant visual experience while following the large, white cloud form to its source. The realization is that the granite and steel created the cloud; much like a light bulb turning on at the blossoming of an idea.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Plowing and Planting in Bosnia
    Artist: Jim Buonaccorsi
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section II

    Painted Steel

    These two “toy” tanks, by Georgia artist Buonaccorsi, are transformed into “plowing and planting” machines. He wants us to consider the mistakes we make in creating “war” and to think about doing things differently in the future.

  • Sculpture: Dry Run
    Artist: William Wareham
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section II

    Painted Steel

    This sculpture, made of cut and welded steel, is a pure and formal composition. Using shapes and the spaces between them, it creates a visual  environment to engage our interest. Close inspection reveals the way the artist bent and assembled shapes to open up spaces and the ultimate complexity of the simple geometic-like forms.  The yellow painted surface adds a strong color element to this composition.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Charger I and II
    Artist: Ted Gall
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section II

    Painted Steel

    These two colorful horses lend their humorous spirited presence to the Park.  Seeming at first to resemble paper cutouts, these sculptures also reveal a thorough understanding of horse anatomy  and have a very “realistic” sense of movement.

    The artist, now a Californian, was at one time the sculptor-in-residence at Fel-Pro, Inc. During his 22-year stay there, Mr. Gall created hundreds of sculptures, four of which are at the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park, donated by the late Lewis Weinberg, former CEO of Fel-Pro and president of the Sculpture Park Board of Directors.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Metamorphosis
    Artist: Ray Katz
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section II

    Steel

    This complex, formal sculpture by Michigan sculptor Katz is made of painted steel. It is the artist’s personal vision of form and space as it represents ideas. In this case, he is talking about the evolutionary process of life and the spiritual aspects of the journey.

  • Sculpture: Municipal Water Carrier
    Artist: Andrew MacGuffie
    Media: Steel and Truck Axles
    Location: Section II

    Steel and Truck Axles

    The Minnesota sculptor, Andrew MacGuffie conceived the piece as a way to talk about our reliance on municipal water distribution systems.  He wants us to think about the fact that in many places in the world water is not readily and easily obtainable.

    MacGuffie used discarded  materials to create his sculpture.  It is a commentary on what we take for granted—above all, that water is plentiful, unlimited and available. The sculpture’s stark industrial forms serve as a powerful reminder of the elaborate bureaucratic systems necessary to sustain this most basic civic  function.

  • Sculpture: Homage to Lazarus
    Artist: Daniel Kainz
    Media: Black Granite
    Location: Section II

    Black Granite

    Pennsylvania sculptor Kainz has worked in stone for 35 years. This granite piece contrasts two stones, several surfaces and different edges. We might think about monuments or stelae, like Stonehenge or Easter Island, as well as Egyptian and Pre-Columbian sculptural and architectural forms.

  • Sculpture: Artist Hanging On
    Artist: Leslie Bruning
    Media: Painted Steel
    Location: Section II

    Painted Steel

    This painted steel sculpture by Omaha, Nebraska sculptor, Leslie Bruning, is titled, “Artist Hanging On.” The title tells the story of a man hanging within the narrow confines of the sculpture and speaks about the precarious nature of the artist’s life and the difficulties in making art.

    Artist’s Website

  • Section III

  • Sculpture: Visions of the Spirit of Skokie and Chicagoland
    Artist: Students of Niles North High
    Media: Fired Clay
    Location: Section III

    Fired Clay

    These sculptural totems, made of fired clay (ceramic), were the class project of Niles North High School art teacher Michael Rush and his students. Each Student made one cube and decorated its surfaces with relief and incised designs. The cube were dried and fired and then highlighted with metallic oxide and refired. Each cube had a large hole through it’s center so that it could be threaded onto vertical PVC pipes creating the totem-like forms in the installation.

  • Sculpture: Wonders of the Deep
    Artist: Students of Niles West High School
    Media: Glazed Ceramic
    Location: Section III

    Glazed Ceramic

    The students of ceramics teacher Barbara Wismer at Niles West High School created the colorful glazed clay forms that make up this “totem-like” sculpture installation.  The ceramic forms were assembled onto lengths of PVC pipe, embedded in concrete.  Students were free to use their imagination in creating these beautiful organic sculptural forms.

  • Sculpture: A World of Difference
    Artist: Students of Evanston Township High School
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section III

    Steel

    The steel silhouette portraits that make up the five totems in this sculpture group represent the diversity of the student population at Evanston Township High School.  They were made in the metal-work classes at the High School over a period of several years.

  • Section IV

  • Sculpture: Coalesce
    Artist: Kevin Casey
    Media: Stainless Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Stainless Steel

    Artist Statement:

    Artist, Kevin Casey, grew up with little or no exposure to the arts until he attended college. His artworks have been displayed throughout Iowa and Illinois. This sculpture, “Coalesce”, was designed using a CAD program. The stainless steel was cut using a plasma cutter. The various components were welded and the surface effect is achieved by implementing a high-powered grinder.

    Although his work is not indicative of any particular issue or theme, it inherently deals with dynamics, movement and perspective. When observed from different angles, the sculpture looks vastly different from each point of view. He enjoys the reaction of others to his work.

  • Sculpture: Lifted
    Artist: Nathan Pierce
    Media: Weather Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Weathered Steel

    In the modern world, where we are connected through technological advancement, we are simultaneously disconnected on a personal level. These sculptural forms examine the roles we play in the quality of our own relationships and of how communication succeeds or fails.

     

  • Sculpture: Reaper
    Artist: Jamie Barber
    Media: Welded Steel and Found Objects
    Location: Section IV

    Welded Steel and Found Objects

    The artist created this alien creature-like object out of materials found in salvage yards. The pieces of sheet metal were welded over a substructure of metal tubing. The artist views the sculpture as an object “from a past war” or something “found at the bottom of the ocean.” He means for it to feel threatening, fearsome. He is interested in anxieties and how they direct our thinking.

    This sculpture, donated by the artist, is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Rite of Passage
    Artist: Mary Cooke
    Media: Steel and Glass
    Location: Section IV

    Steel and Glass

    Cooke arranged steel plates at angles to each other to create the lower portion of the sculpture.  A curving, welded steel armature rises from this base and arches through space. Panels of stained glass inserted into two areas of the web-like armature encourage viewing the sculpture from several different points of view.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Sun Worshipper
    Artist: Ted Gall
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Steel

    This steel sculpture was hand welded of multiple small pieces, cut to reference anatomical parts of the body. The weld marks also contain anatomical references. The artist’s intention was to strip the human form to its base elements and then to rebuild it, exaggerating and emphasizing the heroic strength of the Native American figure.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Homage to Henry
    Artist: Ted Gall
    Media: Cast Aluminum
    Location: Section IV

    Cast Aluminum

    The sculpture, “Homage to Henry”, represents a wheel with interior designs made from shapes resembling automobile gaskets.  It was made during the sculptor Ted Gall’s tenure at Fel-Pro as artist-in-residence.  Gaskets for the Ford Motor Company were among the products made at Fel-Pro and were used by Gall as the inspiration for many of the sculptures he made for the company.  The sculpture has been cast into aluminum.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Gendron
    Artist: Jack Howard-Potter
    Media: Powder Coated Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Powder Coated Steel

    Howard-Potter uses his knowledge of human anatomy and skills as a metal worker to create large scale figurative sculptures. His goal is to take steel, a rigid hard material, and give it a sense of movement and fluidity. His sculpture, Gendron, is coated in a hard red laquered finish. The artist likes to use bright colors to make his work stand out from the landscape.

    Artist’s Website

    Artist Interview VIdeo w/ Jack Howard-Potter

  • Sculpture: Survival
    Artist: Becky Guttin
    Media: Steel, Cast Aluminum and Glass
    Location: Section IV

    Steel, Cast Aluminum and Glass

    This Mexican artist, now living in the United States uses her sculptures as ways to promote her ideologies. “Survival” asks that we sit in the circular environment that she has created using all discarded and recycled materials. (crushed automobile radiators, old angle iron and recycled glass)  In the circle, we are to think about the” survival of our planet” and how it won’t survive if we continue filling it up with all the “things” we throw away.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Know Your Mushrooms
    Artist: Paul Howe
    Media: Steel Bars
    Location: Section IV

    Steel Bars

    The 3 sections of this sculpture are made of intertwined, bent and welded “rebar” (steel). The artist, Paul Howe, tells us that his focus is “on process:  the making of the sculpture”.

    He tells us through the title of the sculpture that he was inspired by the image of mushrooms.  Viewers might consider whether the objects that make up the sculpture are upside-down or right side-up, where they might have come from, whether they represent any other recognizable object and ultimately whether the subject of the sculpture is necessary to our enjoyment of the piece at all.

  • Sculpture: Metalmatic
    Artist: Kari Reardon
    Media: Welded Steel Hoops
    Location: Section IV

    Welded Steel Hoops

    This large, organic and fluid form was made from a huge industrial coil of steel. The coil was suspended downward and, as it moved and dropped, the artist adjusted the coils to the positions she wanted and then welded them together. Her goal was to take a hard man-made material and transform it into a soft billowing form that has a feeling of growth and movement.

  • Sculpture: Adam i Ewa (Adam and Eve)
    Artist: Mirek Struzik
    Media: Steel Wire
    Location: Section IV

    Steel Wire

    “Adam i Ewa” or in English, “Adam and Eve, ”is the work of Polish sculptor Mirek Struzik. Using various types and gauges of steel wire, the artist has created figures full of energy and whimsy. The sculpture might be likened to a line scribbled on paper, with a similar freedom of movement. There is the sense of immediacy as if the artist created the figures very quickly, allowing the lines of the wires to twist and turn as they wished. The artist wanted the figures to have real as well as visual movement. They have a “kinetic energy” that makes them seem to communicate with each other and with viewers.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Walking Stone
    Artist: Bruce Johnson
    Media: Redwood and Copper
    Location: Section IV

    Redwood and Copper

    Using natural redwood from his California home, Johnson added overlapping copper “scales” to complement the grain and texture of the wood. He worked the wood with an assortment of tools to give the sculpture its creative qualities.  The finished form of the piece suggests legs and feet walking.  The simple form and unique textures of the sculpture combine both Eastern and Western sensibilities.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Coming Home
    Artist: Ron Gard
    Media: Steel and Stainless Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Steel and Stainless Steel

    The artist creates very abstract sculptures that he hopes will connect with viewers and cause them to think about their meaning.  Ron Gard, the artist hopes that his sculpture, Coming Home, will make viewers think about returning service members.  He says that those “who return and reunite with family have reason to celebrate”.  He also says that viewers might find different meanings in his work and that is fine so long as his sculptures generate “contact and reflection”.

  • Sculpture: Groundbreaker
    Artist: Ted Gall
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Steel

    This is the first and largest of Ted Gall’s Fel-Pro sculptures to be installed on the property that eventually became the Skokie Northshore  Sculpture Park. This giant “gasket” seemingly half buried in the ground has been on this site across from the former Fel-Pro headquarters long before the Park was formed. It is made of sheet corten steel, cut and welded into large hollow forms. The peg shaped elements along the side represent the pieces removed from the holes in the main part of the sculpture.

    Mr. Gall worked for Fel-Pro for 22 years as an artist -in-residence and often used gaskets, the main product of the company, as a theme for his work.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Observatorio de la Imaginación
    Artist: Luis Torruella
    Media: Painted Aluminum
    Location: Section IV

    Painted Aluminum

    The Puerto Rican sculptor, Luis Torruella created his sculpture from aluminum sheets that were cut, welded, polished and finally patinaed.

    There are two parts to the sculpture: The smaller segment is intended to be a seat that the viewer can use to observe the larger sculptural piece.  The viewer is then able to look through the telescope-like form at the top, and let his thoughts wander in this “observatory of the imagination.”

  • Sculpture: Time Flies
    Artist: Konreid Muench
    Media: Boeing L-1011 Airplane Wings and Aluminum
    Location: Section IV

    Boeing L-1011 Airplane Wings and Aluminum

    “Time-Flies” is a thought provoking image of time spent traveling. The sculpture was made by the cutting, forming and fabrication of authentic aircraft aluminum. The metal is welded and riveted together to form the stylized image of aircraft wheels and axle.

    Having earned a Bachelor of  Fine Arts degree at the School of the Art Institute, Konried Muench began his career in the Chicago area. He also has a sculpture on permanent display  at the Rush Medical Center in Chicago. Presently, the artist maintains a working studio in Tampa, Florida and his work can be seen at various venues  throughout the continental United States.

  • Sculpture: Feminin
    Artist: Rüdiger Seidt
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section IV

    Steel

    Sculptor Seidt works with simple forms whose power comes from their size and use of space. This sculpture, in a simple stylized form, represents the lower half of a woman’s body. Seidt is a self taught artist who learned his craft as an engine fitter in his native Germany.

    Artist’s Website

  • Sculpture: Oscill8
    Artist: Nicole Beck
    Media: Welded Stainless Rings with colorful knobs of mosaic tile on each end
    Location: Section IV

    Welded Stainless Rings with colorful knobs of mosaic tile on each end

    Oscillation is the repetitive variation in time. The dimensions of “Oscill8” are 8’x6’x6′. It is constructed out of stainless steel and glass mosaic. The sculpture represents an infinite wave of light fluctuating between spectrums in equilibrium. It also refers to the phenomenon of many continuous systems naturally occurring.

  • Sculpture: Votive Head 2000-2012
    Artist: Stacy Latt Savage
    Media: Steel and Wood
    Location: Section IV

    Steel and Wood

    This sculpture by  Massachusetts artist, Stacy Latt Savage is meant to be viewed as a universal symbol of “humanness,” having no gender and/or ethnicity or race.   Ms. Savage is very concerned about the scale of her work. She wants to engage viewers through the monumental size of her “sculptural head”.  When installed, “Votive Head” consisted of a steel framework covered with wooden slats. After being on exhibition outdoors for a number of years, the wood began to deteriorate and had to be removed.  By doing so,  the structural interior was exposed and a new and different sculpture was created.

    The new version of this sculpture was donated by the artist to the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park and is now part of the Park’s permanent collection.

  • Sculpture: Dragon Tree of Maintenance
    Artist: Bob Rivera
    Media: Redwood, Painted Steel and Aluminum
    Location: Section IV

    Redwood, Painted Steel and Aluminum

    Brooklyn sculptor, Bob Rivera has created a work that suggests both the shape and size of a large dragon. His creature defends the space it inhabits, playfully balancing its different elements and suggesting imminent movement. This collage-like sculpture entices us with its abstract yet light-hearted use of color, line, shape and space and its use of recognizable “tools” provides a sense of “real world” familiarity.

    This sculpture has been donated to the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park by the artist and is now part of the Park’s permanent collection.

  • Sculpture: Stars in the Wind
    Artist: Richard Taylor
    Media: Painted Aluminum
    Location: Section IV

    Painted Aluminum

    Stars in the Wind was designed on a computer and the patterns generated by the computer were used to cut out the steel forms.  Taylor uses bright colors, often red in his sculptures.

    The sculptor feels that the rhythms in his sculpture are like the rhythms found in music and poetry.  The title of the sculpture comes from a sonnet by William Shakespeare.

  • Section I

  • Sculpture: Bridge To The Next Millennium
    Artist: Jack Holme
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section I

    Steel

    Holme created the idea for this sculpture by playing on a miniature scale with found objects; next came a maquette, a small steel version of the sculpture. Last, the piece was fabricated in its full size, 10 times larger than the model. The piece symbolically represents our passage to the future. The openings represent the pitfalls for those unprepared to meet  new challenges.  The sculpture was created to celebrate the beginning of the 21st century.

    The artist donated his sculpture and it is now part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Fairy Circle
    Artist: Mark Chatterley
    Media: High Fired Clay and Crater Glaze
    Location: Section I

    High Fired Clay and Crater Glaze

    The seven figures that make up Fairy Circle are made of fired clay. At first all the ladies seem to be alike but each has subtle differences. The sculptor often creates groups of figures and is interested in how the figures relate to each other. Michigan sculptor Chatterley is noted for the unusual CRATER glaze he uses on his sculptures. The blue-green glaze with its rough surface has become his trademark. A crater glaze bubbles and boils while it is in the kiln. The surface of the sculpture reflects that process. The artist  built a special kiln large enough to accommodate each full-size figure.

    This sculpture, donated by the artist, is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Weeee
    Artist: Patrick McDonald
    Media: Steel and Concrete
    Location: Section I

    Steel and Concrete

    Oak Park artist Patrick McDonald cast concrete into a towering, tapered monumental form, pierced by circular openings that diminish in size as the eye moves upward. The concrete mass is also offset by a series of protruding steel rods that frame the shape and create interesting patterns in bright sunlight. The artist varies the surface texture from one area to another. McDonald made the work by using full-scale drawings and a model, from which he built the forms and cast the concrete. “Weeee” is set into a concrete base and weighs approximately 20,000 pounds. The Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park commissioned McDonald to construct this sculpture on-site—a process that took several weeks in October 2002.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

  • Sculpture: Lingo
    Artist: Chris Duncan
    Media: Steel and Concrete
    Location: Section I

    Steel and Concrete

    Duncan used additive and subtractive sculptural processes to make this abstract sculpture. The artist made the work by welding together a steel armature and burying it in the ground. He then poured concrete over it, later removing some of the concrete to reveal the steel underneath. These multiple steps enabled Duncan to create Lingo’s various textural surfaces and its asymmetrically balanced form.

  • Sculpture: CLIO
    Artist: Sharon Loper
    Media: Bronze
    Location: Section I

    Bronze

    Most of Sharon Loper’s sculptures are of human and animal forms. Her female figures are often elongated and posed in very statuesque and serene ways. They seem mysterious. Note the eyes of this sculpture; they impart an almost other-worldly look.  Loper works initially in clay in a very contemporary direct style. You can see the way she added clay to the sculpture and can find her tool marks as well. The finished clay model was taken to a foundry and cast into bronze using the lost wax method of casting.

    Artist’s Website

    Artist Interview

  • Sculpture: Like Clockwork
    Artist: Samuel Spiczka
    Media: Corten Steel and Wood
    Location: Section I

    Corten Steel and Wood

    This Minnesota artist has created a sculpture primarily of steel, but with elements of wood and rubber as well. His piece, hanging like a pendulum, speaks about “the human condition” and about the mechanization of our modern society. The artist’s concerns are very philosophical and he wishes to challenge us to view his complex work and find in it new ideas and meanings.

    This sculpture is part of the Permanent Collection of the Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park.

    Artist’s Website

  • Section II

  • Sculpture: Gapingstock
    Artist: Jim Agard
    Media: Corten Steel
    Location: Section II

    Corten Steel

    Mr. Agard is a professor of Art at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. Gapingstock is an abstract sculpture wherein the artist has created two unique interlocking shapes that occupy space in a beautiful and intriguing manner. He is interested in “how forms fit together and in creating formal compositions that are uniquely his own.” He does not want the shapes he creates to refer to any recognizable forms or objects.

  • Sculpture: Circinus
    Artist: Drew Goerlitz
    Media: Steel
    Location: Section II

    Steel

    New York-based Goerlitz creates a different relationship between two recognizable objects first by enlarging the scale of the compass and anvil and then juxtaposing these two objects, he reverses the original relationship between a slender compass and a massive anvil. Goerlitz sees his sculpture as a “visual commentary on the conflict of gender in society”.  As such, the compass, usually thought of as a delicate instrument, towers over the masculine anvil.

  • Sculpture: Points of Influence
    Artist: Darrin Hallowell
    Media: Concrete
    Location: Section II

    “Glasstone” A proprietary high strength concrete containing recycled glass

    This installation consists of multiple pieces with each one being the hollowed out image of the human form.  The various pieces have been placed to allow visitors to walk among them.
    The artist states that it “focuses on fundamental aspects of human relationships and communication…”  It is based “on the figure as a vessel, empty or filled…”

  • Sculpture: Strike II
    Artist: Larry Paul King
    Media: Steel, Steel Mesh, Tar and Paint
    Location: Section II

    Steel, Steel Mesh, Tar and Paint

    The Chicago-born artist created a skeleton or substructure of steel bars, which he then covered with steel mesh and tar. Originally, in a sculpture called “Strike” (exhibited at the park from 1997-2000), he covered the armature with grass reeds. In this version, the reeds have been removed and paint with graphite has been applied in certain areas. King conceived the work as relating to the verb “to strike,” meaning “to strike something with a point, as in lightning.”

  • This brochure is provided free of charge to all visitors of our website.
    It is made possible by grants from:
    The Village of Skokie
    The Niles Township Board
    The Illinois Arts Council
    and others.

    We welcome contributions and are always looking for volunteers.
    Call 847-679-4265 for information

  • © 2018 Skokie Northshore Sculpture Park. Photography by Gerry Holmes. Site by dkddi.